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IP Telephony vs Voice Over IP

  • This topic has 15 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 16 years ago by REDDRACO.
Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 16 total)
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  • #29292 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Hi,

    I’m looking for the main differences between ip telephony and voice over ip. The main purpose of this research is for homework. I have to do a presentation.

    What I understand so far, both ip telephony and voice over ip are refering to the same technology. If this is correct please let me know.

    Thanks in advanced,
    REDDRACO

    #29293 Reply
    Frank
    Guest

    Hi there, what exactly is the topic of your homework? I’m just asking because there in fact is no difference between ip telephony and voice over ip up to my point of view. “ip telephony” is a more colloquial expression for (the more technical) “voice over ip”, and that’s all.

    Best regards

    Frank

    #29294 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Hi,

    Thanks for answering. The topic of my presentation tha I was assigned is the one you read: ip telephony vs voice over ip.

    What I understand so far, both ip telephony and voice over ip is refering to the same technology; has the same features, benefits and use the same protocols. If this is correct please let me know.

    Thanks in advanced,
    REDDRACO

    #29295 Reply
    Frank
    Guest

    Hi there, as I stated before: up to my point of view there is no difference between “ip telephony” and “voice over ip”. These are two expressions for exactly the same thing, where “voice over ip” is the more technical expression.

    That’s why I was asking for the exact topic of your homework, because I don’t understand why anyone should write a homework to explain a difference that doesn’t exist:-).
    Because these two expressions mean the same, they (of course) refer to the same technologies, use the same protocols and have the same advantages or disadvantages compared to traditional telephony, respectively.

    Best regards

    Frank

    #29296 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Hi Frank,

    Thanks for replying to my post. Today I just called to a company and I ask about the main differences of this technologies, and the person who attended me said to me that the main difference is that ip telephony uses a microphone connected to your computer to talk with another person. But this is half-duplex.

    The voice over ip technology uses the regular telephone with an adapter that digitize the voice, and is full-duplex.

    If this is true please let me know. But I don’t think this answer is true, comparing to the bunch of information that I got, incluiding yours.

    And another thing, this homework was assigned to me by a very, very tricky professor.
    Thanks in advanced,
    REDDRACO

    #29297 Reply
    Frank
    Guest

    Hi Reddraco,

    I don’t see this difference between voip and ip telephony that this company told you about. I’ve never heard of any standard that defined these expressions that way. And even if this was true: why should ip telephony be half duplex then?

    Just another idea that comes to my mind when I read what you are writing from this company’s point of view: when I said that there was no difference I meant that there is no difference in the technical realization and technical interpretation of these expressions. If one looks at it literally (and less technically), one COULD define the following (although I WOULDN’T define it that way): “ip telephony” COULD mean that the corresponding subscribers both use IP-based hardware or software telephones, respectively. “voice over ip” COULD mean that the voice data are carried over an ip network but one or both subscribers don’t mandatorily use ip phones (but conventional phones connected to the ip network by the use of gateways).
    But as I said, I WOULDN’T define it that way from a technical point of view (my boss doesn’t either, and he’s a professor for telecommunications).

    Just another thing: You were asking for the difference between “voice over IP” and “IP telephony”. And I said that I don’t see any. Both express that voice is carried over ANY ip network. This might by the internet but it’s not mandatorily the internet (could be a company LAN for instance).
    If you say “voice over internet” or “internet telephony” respectively, these expressions mean that the global internet is used to carry packets that contain voice data. So in fact there is a difference between “voice over ip” and “voice over internet” or “ip telephony” and “internet telephony”, respectively.

    Best regards

    Frank

    #29298 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Frank,

    Thanks for replying. The definitions of both voip and ip telephony I wouldn’t either definte it like that. With the bunch of info that I got vs the answer of that person of x company, that’s why I asked you, because what I read and understand so far is the same thing with different names and people use it interchangeably; another thing is that in the info it mention the same protocols, benefits and features. Like I said, this why I asked you and the info the company gave me didn’t quite convince me.

    One site that I look for the definition is webopedia.com and state that internet telephony, ip telephony and voice over ip is the same thing. (Not exactly in this word but if you read it is something like that).

    When you said that is not mandatorily the internet, it could be a company LAN, what are you refering by company LAN?

    Thanks in advanced,
    REDDRACO

    #29299 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Continue.

    Frank can you give me a basic information about company LAN?

    #29300 Reply
    Noname
    Guest

    A network within a company, something that it does not connect to outside parties.
    That is a LAN (local area network),in oposition to WAN (wide area network)

    Let me suggest http://www.google.com

    Best regards.

    #29301 Reply
    Frank
    Guest

    Hi Reddrago,

    Nonames statement is correct. When you read about LAN just imagine a computer network inside of a company (to make it easy, imagine it just inside of one building). If this network uses the Internet Protocol (short form: IP, a defined “language” that computers can use to communicate with each other, not only in what we call “the internet”), this in fact is an IP network. The exchange of data works exactly like it does in the internet.
    So if we talk about “Voice over IP” or “IP telephony” respectively, it doesn’t mandatorily mean that the global internet is involved in data exchange.

    Best regards

    Frank

    #29302 Reply
    REDDRACO
    Guest

    Hey Frank guess what the differences are?

    On IP Telephony you could assign an IP address to a telephone. While on VoIP you send voice over the internet.

    This is basically the differences that my professor explain to me. Though I’m not quite convinced. From my point of view is the same thing.

    And I wanted to thank you for your help and time.

    Thanks again,
    REDDRACO

    #29303 Reply
    Frank
    Guest

    Hi Reddraco,

    you’re welcome. I think it’s a question of from which point of view you look at these expressions … if your prof thinks that THIS is the difference … well, he’s the one who has to review your point of view. If I was in your position, I would appreciate to discuss this topic with him ;-).

    Best regards and good luck further on

    Frank

    #29304 Reply
    aym
    Guest

    Hi,

    If it can help:

    Voice over IP is related to sending voice paquet over IP network.

    Ip Telephony refers to telephony services in general. So it involves application, devices, Call control solutions.

    So basically, VoIP is technical expression and ToIP is more service/functionnal expression.

    hope it helps

    #29305 Reply
    Pedro
    Guest

    Voice over IP: Technology of voice packets travelling over an IP network (be it public internet or private wide-area network).

    IP Telephony: Use of feature-rich software, applications, and telephones to enhance and guarantee Quality of Service of voice over IP technology.

    regards

    Pedro
    CCNP
    Equant Inc.
    Atlanta, Georgia.

    #29306 Reply
    Hilde
    Guest

    This is what we found so far :
    hope it helps :

    IP telephony (Internet Protocol telephony) is a general term for the technologies that use the Internet Protocol’s packet-switched connections to exchange voice, fax, and other forms of information that have traditionally been carried over the dedicated circuit-switched connections of the public switched telephone network (PSTN). Using the Internet, calls travel as packets of data on shared lines, avoiding the tolls of the PSTN. The challenge in IP telephony is to deliver the voice, fax, or video packets in a dependable flow to the user. Much of IP telephony focuses on that challenge.
    VoIP (voice over IP – that is, voice delivered using the Internet Protocol) is a term used in IP telephony for a set of facilities for managing the delivery of voice information using the Internet Protocol (IP). In general, this means sending voice information in digital form in discrete packets rather than in the traditional circuit-committed protocols of the public switched telephone network (PSTN). A major advantage of VoIP and Internet telephony is that it avoids the tolls charged by ordinary telephone service.
    VoIP specifically refers to sending voice traffic over an IP (Internet Protocol) network. Voice and data convergence refers to sending both voice and data (such as LAN traffic) over any data network (typically an IP network, frame relay network or ATM network).
    IP telephony refers to any “telephone” type service carried over IP – this could include faxing. VoIP is voice over IP only. Sometimes telephony also includes text messaging

    Best regards,

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