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VoIP managerial issues

  • This topic has 20 replies, 1 voice, and was last updated 20 years ago by Chester.
Viewing 6 posts - 16 through 21 (of 21 total)
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  • #20017 Reply
    Webpro
    Guest

    VoIP deployment suffers mostly from folks trying to run concurrent legacy voice and VoIP in their legacy PBX systems.

    Some hurdles for VoIP deployment have not been the tranport technology, but the fact that VoIP ystems did nothing different that the system thay already had installed. No new features, no better service and you have to: A Pay Extra to support IP, B Toss out the 2 year old legacy system and replace it with a new system with fewer features, C Figure out who supports this IT to TeleCom?

    This is where the new breed of VoIP systems come in. VoIP will have significant growth from the small and medium businesses. These folks are using Centrex systems with few features or have small PBX systems that are difficult for office managers to maintain and manage. This is where the VoIP and customer provisioning features really help folks. Simple web interfaces for provisioning (add, changes, deletions)for their allocated extensions and DID numbers. Broser based portals will call loga and click to dial. Full featured server driven phones pushing content to 2, 4 and 25 line displays.

    There are a couple good models out these. One (GoBeam) uses the cell phone model. Buy a bunch of line/minutes per month. Another is buy the IP phone, pay x per month per line and that is all you need.

    Enterprise systems range from $350K to 3 or 4 million smackeroos. The Cisco AAVID system comes in at the low cost end. There have been articles in the last 5 months of Network Computing with VoIP deployments.

    Which is better, monthly service charge managed by the service provider or a exterprise system with large upfront costs and a staff to manage it. Depends on who you are I guess. I know with service provider offerings, companies with offices spread all over the place can take advantage of service provider on-net calling and lower their costs.

    Webpro

    #20018 Reply
    Leto
    Guest

    Just thought I ought to add my two cents. I come from a ‘traditional’ European based LEC. Currently we are looking to deploy VoIP in our core networks and exand that to reach the end user.

    One of the main hurdles we find is QoS right down to the CPE. People will connect to our IP core network by using DSL technologies and there is no overkill in bandwidth there.

    To get back to Krishna’s original question, there are a couple of other, competing technologies there. VoDSL is basicly splitting voice into different frequencies to make better use of copper in the ground (ie. more lines per copperpair), one of the major drawbacks here that this technology does not offer any integration between voice and data. VoATM, in the public networks this could offer some advantages since ATM offers QoS from the start, in the LAN environnement the main problem is that not to many people use ATM based LAN’s.

    The other issue we still find is cost of QoS aware CPE to be used with VoIP services. Routers that support multiple queues and other QoS features are still very expensive, especially when the target market is SME companies (10 to 50 users).

    To get back to Phone Guy’s original answer. It’s not entirely true that IP does not offer resend capabilities, TCP supports resend. UDP is the protocol used for VoIP and this one does not offer resend. In any case it would not be of any use to use resend in the VoIP application, since late packets cannot be played (imagine this). As for the variable routes that IP uses, there is a solution out there named MPLS (based on Tagswitching by Cisco), that solves this problem.

    As for prices. In end-user equipment the prices vary. I’ve seen an interesting German product that starts at USD 1400 for 10 users (this includes software, 5 IP phones and 5 headsets) and just needs a PC to mimmick a PBX. We ourselves sell PBX VoIP boards starting from USD 2300 for 4 ports.

    Good luck with your study.

    Leto

    #20019 Reply
    Webpro
    Guest

    CPE devices that have bandwidth shaping and have a MGCP or SIP NAT don’t exist. H.323 sort of exists but is a pretty heavy and complex protocol that most service providers don’t want to implement.

    Fortunately, I am working with several US companies to develop one. Bandwidth shaping for QoS does exist and the US cost is coming down pretty quickly.

    #20020 Reply
    Webpro
    Guest

    CPE devices that have bandwidth shaping and have a MGCP or SIP NAT don’t exist. H.323 sort of exists but is a pretty heavy and complex protocol that most service providers don’t want to implement.

    Fortunately, I am working with several US companies to develop one. Bandwidth shaping for QoS does exist and the US cost is coming down pretty quickly.

    #20021 Reply
    Chester
    Guest

    I have enjoyed reading everyone’s comments and have found them very helpful.

    I am looking at the possibility of deploying VOIP. I have a strong computer background but I am new to the arena of Telecommunications. We currently use half a T1 for data and the other half for voice but due to a Network service being offered in our area we are upgrading to a 10Mb fiber optic connection between locations. I was hoping that I can use the 10Mb link for voice as well as data. I could run an ISDN line to each location but then I am increasing my monthly payments.

    I am currently running a NEAX 2400 which is upgradeable to IPX. I have also been looking at a CISCO solution to VOIP. I have learned that some sales people will sell you what you want even if their engineers don’t have a clue on how to deliver.

    The phone system is for communicating with customers as well as communicating within the company. Is VOIP ready for this type of application using this band width?

    Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

    #20022 Reply
    Chester
    Guest

    I have enjoyed reading everyone’s comments and have found them very helpful.

    I am looking at the possibility of deploying VOIP. I have a strong computer background but I am new to the arena of Telecommunications. We currently use half a T1 for data and the other half for voice but due to a Network service being offered in our area we are upgrading to a 10Mb fiber optic connection between locations. I was hoping that I can use the 10Mb link for voice as well as data. I could run an ISDN line to each location but then I am increasing my monthly payments.

    I am currently running a NEAX 2400 which is upgradeable to IPX. I have also been looking at a CISCO solution to VOIP. I have learned that some sales people will sell you what you want even if their engineers don’t have a clue on how to deliver.

    The phone system is for communicating with customers as well as communicating within the company. Is VOIP ready for this type of application using this band width?

    Any comments would be greatly appreciated.

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