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Directional trunks

Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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  • #33134 Reply
    Hans Bergman
    Guest

    I am assessing the trunking requirements for a PBX. The trunks are split up in groups of incoming, outgoing and bi-directional trunks. Do I calculate the capacity for each group, and then make some in each group bi-directional?

    Any suggestions?

    #33135 Reply
    Jade Clayton
    Guest

    Hans,
    If you are utilizing 800 or freephone services, then you want to count those trunks individually, and keep them as thier own service of incoming only. The reason for this is you need to route the traffic to a long distance provider, which will be connected via their own trunk groups. If you do not seperate them then your PBX will be routing outbound calls to these trunks which would be a bad thing.
    For local trunks, it is best to have them as bidirectional, or ISDN if possible. ISDN signaling will enable you to provide incoming exention information from the central office switch for Direct Inline Dialed extensions.
    As for outbound long distance, you can include this in your bidirectional trunks as well, since dialing a “1” will route the call automatically to your long distance provider (if you are in North America). The only reason I can see to not include your outbound long distance in your local trunking is if you have dual long distance providers, say one for national and one for international.

    regards,

    Jade Clayton
    Author: McGraw-Hill illustrated Telecom Dictionary.

    #33136 Reply
    Hans Bergman
    Guest

    Hi Jade:
    Thank you for your reply. This is what I get from your reply: If I don’t have 800 service, and I use a single LD provider, I can create a single bi-directional trunk group for all traffic. This obviously saves trunks compared to splitting up the groups in incoming, bidirectional and outgoing. Please conmfirm.

    Hans Bergman
    hans@teldesign.com

    PS: Just ordered your book.

    #33137 Reply
    Jade Clayton
    Guest

    Yes you are right, and keep in mind that a bidirectional trunk is best deployed as an ISDN PRI. Even if you have an ACD system with agents answering calls, you can still route calls via your ISDN signaling. The PBX manufacturer will provide info on their ISDN interface and how to configure it for inbound and outbound calls.

    Thanks for ordering the book. I hope it helps.

    regards,

    JC

    #33138 Reply
    Jade Clayton
    Guest

    Hans,
    If your PBX is capable, make your directional trunks the primary for thier purpose (incoming and outgoing) and make the bidirectional trunks overflow, or alternate route trunks.
    Jade

    #33139 Reply
    lovekesh mehta
    Guest

    I need to know more all about the
    traffic calculation, the BHCA, ERLANGS,
    from the very basic to a good
    preview.Give me some good weblinks
    and sites where I can find These.

    #33140 Reply
    Hans Bergman
    Guest
Viewing 7 posts - 1 through 7 (of 7 total)
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